Monthly Dyslexia News Digest – January 2017

In the headlines

28 December 2016

Caitlin Glover, 12, from Chelmsford has designed a virtual reality system to help spot the early signs of dyslexia. She herself was only diagnosed with the condition when she got to secondary school. She drew on her own experience and invented a system that she believes could help primary school children not ‘fall through the gaps’ and feel defeated early on in their education. She developed a working prototype of her invention at an Acorn Accelerator course run by Acorn Aspirations, a social impact company that trains 12-19 year olds to code and develop aps.

See Caitlin’s pitch at Wayra Demo Day 2016 on youtube here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sMgbdhRYLY

See her website www.sypereducation.com

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-38421064

23 January 2017

Plans for a new combined primary and secondary school in the Sevenoaks, Kent district with a dyslexia specialism have suffered a setback after county chiefs have expressed doubts over the suitability of one of the proposed sites.

They plan to call it the Da Vinci School after the Italian artist and mathematician who is believed to have been dyslexic. Entry would be open to children of all academic backgrounds and ability. It would be non-fee paying because the teachers behind the scheme, Fiona Gruneberg and Abby Lloyd say that schools are struggling to find the money to supplement special educational needs departments and there is less funding for dyslexic children leaving dyslexic children left behind or having to pay privately for dyslexic support.

Source: Offline.

24 January 2017

Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have uncovered new insight into the brain mechanisms that may underlie dyslexia. Their tests demonstrate that an important feature of human memory ability “implicit memory” decays faster among dyslexics making them less able to make reliable predictions for both simple and complex stimuli. One of the report’s authors noted that “The formation of adequate predictions is crucial for becoming an expert in general, and an expert reader in particular. Achieving this depends on matching printed words with predictions based on previous encounters with related words, but such predictions are less accurate in dyslexics.”

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-01-dyslexia-linked-shorter-memory-previous.html