Monthly Dyslexia News Digest – May 2018

In the headlines

3 May 2018

‘The Mirror’ reports that Paul Whiteman, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers and Helen Boden, CEO of the British Dyslexia Association, along with twenty-four other charities, have sent an open letter to the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, stating that children with Special Needs like dyslexia, partial sight, autism or learning difficulties are being the hardest hit by the government’s policy of austerity. The spending cuts in education are meaning that these children are not getting the help and support they so desperately need. The NAHT conference to be held in Liverpool in May is going to demand that the government provides more funding for children with complicated needs.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/head-teachers-warn-children-disabilities-12469150

7 May 2018

The Scottish Children’s Services Coalition (SCSC) have called on the Scottish Government to review how local authorities are supporting children and young people with complex and high level needs. There has been a decline in the number of children with additional support needs (ASN) such as autism, dyslexia and ADHD receiving a so-called Co-ordinated Support Plan (CSP). Having a CSP entitles the child to additional resources and places statutory duties on local authorities to review and ensure that the support provisions contained within the CSP are being met. Local authorities are more reluctant to provide CSPs due to the on-going cuts in health, education and social work services.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/leading-providers-of-services-to-children-call-for-more-support-1-4735841

22 May 2018

The British Dyslexia Association (BDA) has released its 2018 Style Guide which aims to encourage designers, businesses and teachers to consider dyslexics when making typeface, colour, spacing and imagery choices in their written communications including websites, apps and brands. The BDA has been publishing the guide annually for twenty years. It has been reviewed by researchers at the University of Southampton, who have collated the most recent research on dyslexia and readability. Recommendations include using sans serif typefaces like Arial, Verdana, or Tahoma, making fonts at least 12 pt with headings sized twenty percent larger than the normal text and for the first time looking at the spacing between letters and words which has an impact on readability too.

https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/21-27-may-2018/designing-dyslexia-style-guide-make-reading-easy-everyone/

Download your own copy of the Dyslexia Style Guide 2018 from this link to the British Dyslexia Association website –

https://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/common/ckeditor/filemanager/userfiles/Dyslexia_Style_Guide_2018-final.pdf