Monthly Dyslexia News Digest – June 2018

In the headlines

14 June 2018

Dr Daryl Brown, Headteacher at Maple Hayes Hall in Lichfield which is a school specialising in teaching dyslexic children, has written in the TES about how the introduction of EHC (Education, Health and Care) plans in 2014 has created problems in SEND provision in schools. His experience has been that local authorities are reluctant to do the necessary assessment tests on struggling children because if found to be in need of extra support the council has a legal duty to follow up with funding for the necessary support up to the age of 25 where needed. EHC plans are more complex than the previous statements of SEN, which had six sections. EHC plans have twelve sections.   Dr Brown is aware of the frustrations of parents trying to get their children assessed so they can access the support they need. The process has become lengthy and expensive as the parents are having to fight every step of the way.

https://www.tes.com/news/big-problem-heart-send-funding

24 June 2018

Sally Magnusson’s 26 year old son Rossie Stone who was diagnosed with dyslexia aged 11 has turned his innovative technique for learning into a range of educational comic books. He used to turn his notes for his Highers studies into comic book form with smaller text boxes with images alongside. He found the technique helped him to learn the content. Having done a degree at art school he founded Dekko Comics three years ago. The company produces monthly issues, which feature maths and English in every issue. Two Scottish Local Authorities are already using them in their schools and they receiving a lot of interest and acclaim.

Have a look for yourself on their website – https://dekkocomics.com

https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/son-bbc-news-anchor-overcomes-12778550

27 June 2018

A team of Norwegian researchers claim to have discovered another ‘gene for dyslexia’ and have written up their research in the Journal of Medical Genetics. They investigated 36 members of a Norwegian family to look for patterns in their genes. The family has a number of members with developmental dyslexia who exhibit a different processing pathway in response to phonological tasks and have impaired discrimination of both rapidly presented visual and auditory non-verbal information. The team are adding to the on-going threads of research that document the array of genes that seem to be involved in dyslexia.

https://jmg.bmj.com/content/36/9/664