Monthly Dyslexia News Digest – July 2017

In the headlines

5 July 2017

The team at St John’s College, University of Oxford have held a thank you lunch for contributors to the UK Dyslexia Archive. The project was launched in November last year and seeks to trace the history of the learning difficulty. The researchers have begun to interview key figures in dyslexia research and to build and maintain an archive of dyslexia research papers. They intend to investigate the science of reading, the politics of dyslexia and people’s everyday experience of dyslexia. The project has its own website https://dyslexiahistory.web.ox.ac.uk/home

https://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk/discover/news/celebrating-history-dyslexia/

17 July 2017

Adam Blumsum, 12 years old, has raised £1,200 to provide a bursary for another dyslexic child to get specialist educational help at Flexi-School Dyslexia. He himself attended the school for two years on a part-time basis to receive the school’s multi-sensory teaching in small groups to help him with his dyslexia. Narinda Algar founded the school to help her daughter, Lucia. It currently has 40 pupils and 5 staff.

http://www.kentonline.co.uk/malling/news/12-year-olds-bursary-for-dyslexic-children-128967/

17 July 2017

The teachers behind the plans for a new school in Kent which will support pupils with dyslexia, which featured in our first Dyslexia News Digest in January this year, are running two taster sessions on 2 and 29 August for pupils and parents to sample the teaching style. They plan to soon lodge their formal application for the school with the Department of Education. If successful the school should open in September 2019.

They have developed a website which explains their ethos and mission and records how the proposal is developing https://www.davincischool.org.uk

http://www.kentlive.news/tasting-the-future-how-parents-can-learn-about-a-new-type-of-school-in-west/story-30443936-detail/story.html

28 July 2017

Chicago’s Heritage Outpost Coffee Shop was transformed into an immersive educational experience called the Dyslexia Café. The menus and signage all featured letters that were compressed, jumping off the page, duplicated, backward, or mixed up to make a different word. Customers felt that the experience helped them to really understand the difficulties dyslexics deal with every day. Everyone Reading Illinois wanted to raise dyslexia awareness with this clever concept.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-life-adagency-interns-dyslexia-0728-story.html