Monthly Dyslexia News Digest – December 2017

In the headlines

Behind the headlines

We report on two conflicting news stories published on the same day about Christian Boer’s Dyslexie font developed specifically to help dyslexics. We have covered this topic before back in June 2017 when reporting on the publication of “Muriel’s Murals” by Dean Wilkinson and Rebecca Morton which used the font.

4 December 2017

The Good News Network reports that Dyslexie font is designed specifically for dyslexia and that it really works. Boer devised a font that dealt with the issues of the dyslexic brain making the 3D movements of switching, rotating and mirroring the letters. He made the underside of the letters bolder so that they do not flip, he made the ‘twin’ letters like b and d no longer match up by slanting them differently, he made ascenders and descenders longer, he made bigger gaps in c, s and e, he put wider spacing between letters in words and he made capitals and punctuation bigger.   His font is widely used and is available to download for free home use at

4 December 2017

Meanwhile researchers at the Behavioural Science Institute and Department of Special Education at Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands have reported on their findings on studies of the effects of the Dyslexie font in the Annals of Dyslexia pp 1-18. They claim to have discovered that Dyslexie font does NOT benefit reading in children with or without dyslexia. Separate studies claim that there is no difference between reading speed whether Dyslexie font or Arial font is used. Marinus et al (2016) claim to have discovered that if Arial font is matched with Dyslexie font for within-word and between-word spacing, reading speed is the same for both fonts. They conclude that if indeed Dyslexie font aids reading it is not because of the design of the shape of the letters but because of the increase in word spacing it uses.

11 December 2017

Researchers from the Department of Psychology at University of Jyvaskyla, Finland and Jyvaskyla Centre for Interdisciplinary Brain Research have discovered a longitudinal interaction between brain and cognitive measures on hearing speech taken when the babies are just 6 months old to their reading development when they reach the age of 14. The children in the long-term study had one or both parents with dyslexia so had an inherited risk.   This discovery could save years of waiting to see if the child has dyslexia and allow much earlier intervention and support.

14 December 2017

Judith Bliss, Founder and CEO of MindPlay, asks ‘Are you Dyslexia aware?’ She has produced a 10 question quiz for covering common myths and misunderstandings surrounding Dyslexia. Find the quiz at this link –