Capturing the dyslexic’s experience

 Attempts to help people to experience dyslexia themselves

In the ongoing quest to raise awareness of dyslexia a number of people have come up with some ingenious methods of allowing people to ‘experience’ dyslexia themselves. The dyslexic graphic designer, Sam Barclay, has created the book “I wonder what it’s like to be dyslexic” using innovative typography to help people try to understand the impact of dyslexia on people’s ability to read.

He raised £55,000 for the project on Kickstarter back in November 2013.   He hopes that the book is also reassuring to fellow dyslexics as it shows that someone else understands what they experience.

He himself is a successful graphic designer who has worked for Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre, Wiggle Bikes, Rosie and Twine, Dyspla and Portsmouth University amongst others.

He has his own website showcasing his work and clients at www.sambarclay.co.uk

And his book has its own website at www.reedeeng.com where you can order the book

Another dyslexic designer, Daniel Britton, has used a different strategy by designing a typeface that slows down non-dyslexic readers to the speed of a dyslexic reader to help them understand and experience the frustration and difficulties dyslexics have when reading.

He wants to produce Dyslexia Educational Packs for Primary and Secondary school pupils and has raised the necessary money through the website CrowdFunder.

He himself was only diagnosed at 18 years old. He has his own website at www.danielbritton.info

And Victor Widell, a software developer has created a stir online by developing a website that he says allows people to experience dyslexia. He created it after talking to a friend with dyslexia who described what the process of reading was like to her. See the website for yourself at this link

geon.github.io/programming/2016/03/03/dsxyliea

Reactions to his site are wide and varied with seemingly every media outlet with the vaguest interest in dyslexia and many with no obvious interest picking up on the story. Some say it gives a fair impression of what their experience of dyslexia is like, while others say it does not capture their experience at all. It certainly provided a talking point and provoked interesting discussions around the topic either way which all contributes to raising awareness and understanding.